During “What Grows,” visitors interacted with the production through the windows of the Smith Center and the online portal. The second part, “The Gathering,” was a live virtual event. In “Reorientation,” visitors could individually experience the website and physical space, which was reconfigured to incorporate the ways people interacted with the components. “Reorientation” also included a digital guide of resources to help people cope with grief, including community-based organizations and online assistance.

“I am very struck by the ways in which this project is such a specific expression of this group of three students. This is their first time in collaboration with each other and working together, so the time spent in collaboration was very intense,” said Ahmadinejad, a visiting lecturer in TDM. “They were very generous, caring, and thoughtful, and wanted to respect each other’s ideas. At the same time, they each nudged the project in a certain direction, and the resulting experience is something that only these students could have made in this way, at this time.”

The design team also included Matt Wolff and Nilas Andersen for website design; Darien Carr, M.Arch. ’23, and Emily Majors, M.Arch. ’23, for installation design; Cha See for lighting design consultation; Sarah Espii Proctor for audio, video, and AR design; Eli Schleicher ’18 for stage management; Gabby Preston ’20 for dramaturgy; Andrew Mitchell for technical direction and fabrication; Joe Short for technical and physical production; and Angel Hoyang ’23 for assistant stage management.

The physical installation closed after 10 days, but the website will remain active for the next few months.

Related

Wonderland reimagined

Virtually Oberon features Queer Bodies in Motion’s first artistic endeavor, ‘Alice in Rainbowland’

A.R.T. maintains global collaborations, with technology and remote coordination

Directors, specialists, and crews Zoom in to help actors and stage productions

Let there be light

‘Lucidity’ installation offers breath, healing, catharsis